Louis Armstrong

Louis Armstrong
Louis Armstrong

Louis Armstrong has a Starscore of 273,113 and is No.16578 today on the Global social media chart

With a total of 1,731,789 Facebook fans. Today Louis Armstrong gained 794 Facebook fans. His social media ranking has moved up 2 places in the daily Jazz Chart to no.33 and remains at no.37 in the all time Jazz Chart.

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Louis Armstrong
Louis Armstrong - Social network statistics today

(Note: All figures below are aggregate totals counting fans from all accounts and pages that a brand has.)

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Louis Armstrong
Louis Armstrong - All social chart positions today

Currently charting outside the top 200 in these charts

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Biography

Louis Armstrong (August 4, 1901 – July 6, 1971), nicknamed Satchmo or Pops, was an American jazz trumpeter and singer from New Orleans, Louisiana.Coming to prominence in the 1920s as an inventive trumpet and cornet player, Armstrong was a foundational influence in jazz, shifting the focus of the music from collective improvisation to solo performance. With his instantly recognizable gravelly voice, Armstrong was also an influential singer, demonstrating great dexterity as an improviser, bending the lyrics and melody of a song for expressive purposes. He was also skilled at scat singing (vocalizing using sounds and syllables instead of actual lyrics).Renowned for his charismatic stage presence and voice almost as much as for his trumpet-playing, Armstrong's influence extends well beyond jazz music, and by the end of his career in the 1960s, he was widely regarded as a profound influence on popular music in general. Armstrong was one of the first truly popular African-American entertainers to cross over, whose skin color was secondary to his music in an America that was severely racially divided. He rarely publicly politicized his race, often to the dismay of fellow African-Americans, but took a well-publicized stand for desegregation during the Little Rock Crisis. His artistry and personality allowed him socially acceptable access to the upper echelons of American society that were highly restricted for a black man.